Essay on why i want to be an interior designer

My only key work requirements are a good phone line, a solid internet connection and a major airport within driving distance well, a quiet room and a pot of coffee are pretty important as well. After a lot of data gathering, analysis and pro-con list making, my wife and I have chosen to relocate from Ann Arbor, Michigan to Pueblo, Colorado.

Essay on why i want to be an interior designer

Although I did not take part in these projects at the time, I understood the necessity to prepare students for a future in which our societies would become increasingly older due to declining fertility rates and rising life expectancy through which the number of people aged 60 years and over had multiplied sincereaching hundreds of millions worldwide.

Accordingly, it was good that there was a growing focus on people in their later life and their way of living, which has ever since led to a lot of research, both practical and theoretical.

However, when I was recently confronted personally with the current state of care for the elderly, I realized that there is still a lot to improve, invent, innovate, and discuss when it comes to the way old people in the need of care live, particularly in a society that is ever more individualized, lacking traditional family models in which such care used to take place.

That is why we want to dedicate an entire new issue of MONU to a topic that we call "Late Life Urbanism" and which we want to investigate on an architectural level, but on the level of the city too Being a filmmaker, he points out that moving images in this day and age are particularly effective forms of communication as they have the capacity to make people want to engage.

For him, filmmaking is a very useful process that taught him how to talk to people, how to listen to people, how to observe spaces critically and with an open mind, in order to understand the unique urban dynamics that make every space special and worthy of care Discover Eastern European Architecture and Urbanism.

Being a fresh graduate and only being part of the work force for collectively under a year, I've begun to understand that these relationships must be tailored per architect, firm, client, project, etc. After reading MONU's issue 28 "Client-shaped Urbanism", it begun to open my eyes to how both a client or architect may feel they are being mistreated in certain situations and projects.

Obviously, clients and architects mutually want a smooth relationship but understanding perspective, balance, and experience can affect the connection between the two.

In university, we are often told to put ourselves in the shoes of the user when thinking of our projects.

Essay on why i want to be an interior designer

That empathy begins to that help further our designs, so understanding perspective is highly important. In the first article, "Sympathy for the Devil" was striking and enjoyable to read for fact that it was written in a different perspective that wasn't directly architecture, but still very relatable.

It was intriguing because it made the reader not only wear the "devil's" shoes but feel insecure about the situation unfolding, which ended up being the clients experience redefined. It really starts off the issue with a perspective, we as architects, have most likely not experienced firsthand and introduces the thoughts of a client.

Other articles in this issue, give more insight of what a client hopes to expect for their experiences and what not, for example the article "What Client Wants". The interviews are what I found the most informative for myself, mainly because they were raw discussions of what they believe is happening to our industry without all the unnecessary fluff.

Their experiences with different clients, project managers, competitions, etc. The "Behind the Scenes: A Conversation with my Client" was a relief from some of other articles negativity of why we fail to have a balanced relationship between client and architect.

This conversation expands on the success of a healthy client-architect relationship and what they look for in each other. This is why they have successful projects and relationships. Not everyone can find a perfect client though and "Expectation and Reality" begins to address the humour of the reality of our career.

These comic strips were a great comical relief in the issue. Even being a newbie to the workforce of the architecture world, I can already relate to some of these comics. I even passed along the magazine to show these images to a couple of my peers and co-workers to give them a good chuckle.

Even the reality of the concept sketch to construction sequence of sketches is too relatable; especially coming out of college with bright hopeful eyes for design opportunities and being dragged back down to the reality for normal projects with low budgets.

Speaking of university again, quite a few articles brought up the architecture education and how to maybe improve our understanding of clients.

Speculating on a Human Centred Architectural Pedagogy" as well, we are trained more to focus on the user and how they experience the space and less on the client specifically. These two people may overlap or could have nothing to do with each other, so giving more experience on that could be more thought-provoking for design concepts.

Alejandro Zaera-Polo mentions in the article "Project Managers and the End of the Dominatrix Architect" that they think that maybe we should introduce more client managing classes in universities, which I think having the option is actually an interesting thought.

To be exposed a little more to the reality and what to look out for, would be a little more helpful for some students. At the same time, Stefan Paeleman mentioned in "Not all about Beauty" had an opposing view, that university is the time to "have a certain freedom, and maybe to dream a little more" and that it could "deprive" students from creativity.

In one way I agree with this statement, but in another way, it could force students to be more collaborative and a find an alternative method to be creative, like the idea of "Human Centred Architectural Pedagogy" introduced by Pajerski.

These discussions of education over multiple articles is something I would like to see more of in the future as it will shape how to alter our profession for the better. This issue really captured the right amount of views on how clients shape our designs for the good and the bad and how architects can do better with our relationships with the clients through perspective, balance, and experience.

Megan Michalski is an architect who graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is part of FOLDa curatorial and publishing platform. This review was first published by the Archinect on July 5, Especially for architects and urban designers, one way to make themselves understood better, is to use the power of "narratives", helping them to connect not only to experts and intellectuals in the field, but to everybody else too.

To find out what such urban and architectural narratives might look like today - and what they were like in the past - how they can be crafted, where they may be used and how narratives can help improving our cities in general is one of the main aims of the upcoming issue of MONU that we call "Narrative Urbanism" We consider "clients" to be crucial participants in the shaping and creating of urban spaces.

We intend to find out how to improve things, such as the collaboration between client and architect or urban designer, for a more satisfying outcome for everybody involved and above all for the users and inhabitants of cities.Every interior designer knows that rush and thrill when a client finally sees their finished room for the first time.

That sheer pleasure on their face and the knowledge that you did something great for them that will influence them and make them happy for years to come, is an incredible feeling. I’ve been designing interiors for almost 25 years. And I still get asked from time to time, why did I choose interior design?

Another factor my decision to become an interior designer was my love of doing things for other people and making other people happy. in order for the client to find out for themselves, what they truly want. Why I am Interested in Interior Design – Essay Why I am Inspired to Become an Interior Designer One of the main reasons why I am interested in Interior Design is because it allows me to get creative in order to solve a problem.

Having a Career in Fashion Design The fashion design career, has recently emerged as one of the most popular and competitive among young people. Those who actually succeed in design have a very individualistic personal style and don’t follow trends set by others.

Virtual LM: A Pictorial Essay of the Engineering and Construction of the Apollo Lunar Module: Apogee Books Space Series 47 [Scott P. Sullivan] on r-bridal.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Apollo Lunar Module is revealed in this book to be both an engineering masterpiece and a work of art.

In life I want to become a fashion designer. My goals are to create clothing that is for all sizes, ages, and genders. In my clothing I want t show a creative side of my art ability and I want to make my clothing affordable for all as well.

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